CFP: ASFS 2019 Making and Breaking Rules in Sydney

Australian Society for French Studies Annual Conference 2019

Making and Breaking Rules

University of New England – Western Sydney University

Location: UNE Sydney

10-12 December 2019

When we speak, write and act, when we produce and interpret culture, we are consciously or unconsciously following rules of various kinds. But what does it mean to follow a rule? What are the consequences of failing to do so? Who has the power to institute and enforce rules? How can rules be modified or dissolved?

These general questions can be sharpened in specific domains of French, Francophone, and Comparative studies, interpreted in the widest possible way:

  • how do generic conventions shape our expectations and guide our reception of literary works, films, television drama and other cultural products?
  • how can generic conventions encode social values?
  • how do specific works break with conventions and what kinds of impact can this have?
  • is cultural innovation always a matter of breaking rules?
  • how do new rules arise and spread?
  • how has the history of France, and of French colonization and decolonization, shaped specific approaches to rewriting social and political rules?
  • how can a universalism of rules (“one rule for all”) correct or reinforce injustices, depending on the situation?
  • to what degree is accuracy and aptness in language use and translation a matter of conformity to rules?
  • when and how should rules of grammar and usage be taught in the language classroom?
  • how should non-standard grammar and usage be presented in teaching?
  • what effects have regulatory bodies had on the evolution of French as it is used throughout the Francophone world?

Participants are encouraged to reflect on rules broadly conceived, as:

  • laws and regulations;
  • political programs and platforms;
  • norms of ability and disability;
  • social conventions;
  • etiquette and politeness;
  • gender constructs;
  • religious precepts;
  • generic conventions;
  • formal constraints;
  • research protocols;
  • conflicting epistemologies;

and to consider a range of rule-making and -breaking practices:

  • prescription and legislation;
  • the making explicit and codification of existing practices;
  • preservation and recovery of traditional wisdom;
  • discretion in the application of rules;
  • civil disobedience;
  • deviance, deviation and clinamen;
  • transgression;
  • tradition and innovation;
  • law enforcement and crime.

We invite proposals for individual papers (20 minutes) and for panels (three papers of 20 minutes each) related to the theme of making and breaking rules. We will also consider proposals that do not relate directly to this theme.

Please send your proposal of 250 words for papers in English or French, or suggestion of panels, to vgosetti@une.edu.au by Monday 6 May 2019.

Important dates

  • Deadline for submitting proposals for papers/panels: 6 May 2019
  • Notification of acceptance: June 2019
  • Early-bird registration: ends 4 September 2019
  • Full registration: 5 September 2019 onwards
  • Postgraduate session: Monday 9 December 2019

Conference Organising Committee
Chris Andrews (Western Sydney University), Valentina Gosetti & Sophie Patrick (University of New England)

The ASFS Annual Conference 2019 will blend with the conference

The Effects of the Oulipo: Impact, Continuities, Appropriations, Reactions
11-13 December 2019

Organising committee: Chris Andrews (Western Sydney University), Christelle Reggiani (Université de Paris IV), Christophe Reig (Université de Perpignan), Hermes Salceda (Universidad de Vigo).


Colloque annuel de l’Australian Society for French Studies 2019

Règles et dérèglements

University of New England – Western Sydney University

UNE Sydney

10-12 décembre 2019

Lorsque nous parlons, écrivons et agissons, lorsque nous produisons et interprétons la culture, nous suivons consciemment ou inconsciemment des règles de différentes sortes. Mais que veut dire suivre une règle ? Quelles sont les conséquences de ne pas le faire? Qui a le pouvoir d’instituer et de faire respecter les règles ? Comment les règles peuvent-elles être modifiées ou dissoutes ?

Ces questions générales pourront être affinées dans des domaines spécifiques au sein des études françaises, francophones et comparées, interprétées de la manière la plus large possible :

  • Comment les conventions génériques façonnent-elles nos attentes et guident-elles notre réception d’œuvres littéraires, de films, de séries télévisées et d’autres produits culturels ?
  • comment les conventions génériques peuvent-elles encoder des valeurs sociales ?
  • comment des œuvres spécifiques rompent-elles avec les conventions et quels types d’impact cela peut-il avoir ?
  • l’innovation culturelle est-elle toujours une question de violation des règles ?
  • comment les nouvelles règles apparaissent-elles et se propagent-elles ?
  • comment l’histoire de la France, de la colonisation et de la décolonisation françaises a-t-elle façonné des approches spécifiques de réécriture des règles sociales et politiques ?
  • comment un universalisme de règles (« une règle pour tous ») peut-il corriger ou renforcer les injustices, selon la situation ?
  • dans quelle mesure l’exactitude et l’aptitude à utiliser une langue et à traduire sont-elles une question de conformité aux règles ?
  • quand et comment les règles de grammaire et d’utilisation doivent-elles être enseignées en classe de langue ?
  • comment faut-il présenter la grammaire et l’usage non standard dans l’enseignement ?
  • quels effets les organismes de réglementation ont-ils eu sur l’évolution du français tel qu’il est utilisé dans le monde francophone ?

Les participants sont encouragés à réfléchir sur les règles au sens le plus large, dans différents domaines possibles :

  • lois et règlements
  • programmes et plateformes politiques
  • normes d’aptitude et d’invalidité
  • conventions sociales
  • étiquette et politesse
  • les concepts de genre
  • préceptes religieux
  • conventions génériques
  • contraintes formelles
  • protocoles de recherche
  • épistémologies en conflit

et envisager un éventail de pratiques d’établissement de règles et de rupture :

  • prescription et législation
  • explicitation et codification des pratiques existantes
  • préservation et récupération de la sagesse traditionnelle
  • discrétion dans l’application des règles
  • désobéissance civile
  • déviance, déviation et clinamen
  • la transgression
  • tradition et innovation
  • application de la loi et criminalité

Nous sollicitons des propositions de communications individuelles (20 minutes) et de panels (trois communications de 20 minutes chacune) sur le thème de l’établissement et de la violation des règles. Nous examinerons également les propositions qui ne concernent pas directement ce thème.

Veuillez envoyer votre proposition de 250 mots pour des communications en anglais ou en français, ou une suggestion de panel, à vgosetti@une.edu.au avant le lundi 6 mai 2019.

Dates

  • Date limite de soumission des propositions de communications / panels : 6 mai 2019
  • Notification d’acceptation : juin 2019
  • Inscription early-bird : se termine le 4 septembre 2019
  • Inscription complète : à partir du 5 septembre 2019
  • Séance dédiée aux doctorants : lundi 9 décembre 2019

Comité d’organisation

Chris Andrews (Western Sydney University), Valentina Gosetti et Sophie Patrick (University of New England)

 

Le colloque annuel de l’ASFS 2019 accompagnera le colloque:
Les effets de l’Oulipo : Impact, continuités, détournements, réactions
11-13 décembre 2019

Comité d’organisation : Chris Andrews (Western Sydney University), Christelle Reggiani (Université de Paris IV), Christophe Reig (Université de Perpignan), Hermes Salceda (Universidad de Vigo)

 

CFP: Cultural Transformations at the CSAA 2019 Conference

Cultural Studies Association of Australasia Conference 2019: Cultural Transformations

University of Queensland, Dec 4 – 6, 2019

Abstracts Due 30 April, 2019

 

Confirmed Keynotes

It seems the future is no longer rushing to meet us but has already arrived. The speed and extent of the cultural transformations currently taking place around us raise urgent and imperative questions. Cultural studies researchers have recently turned to examine these questions across a representatively broad range of fields, including gender and sexuality studies, critical race and disability studies, film and media studies, internet and digital cultural studies, affect studies and the environmental humanities. Yet significant work remains to be done. How are we to respond most effectively to such issues as the disappearance of salaried jobs and their replacement with a gig economy, to climate change and species extinction, to the rise of “populism” and the new right, as well as the ever-worsening treatment of refugee and indigenous populations, to the systemic gender and sexuality-based disadvantage revealed by #metoo and the divisive SSM poll, to the emergence of AI and algorithmic logics, as well as gene-editing and other biomedical technologies?

The 2019 conference of the Cultural Studies Association of Australasia aims to provide a forum at which both the challenges posed and opportunities afforded by these transformations can be collectively addressed. Taking as its theme “Cultural Transformations,” the conference welcomes proposals for papers or panels that address this topic from a diverse and inclusive range of perspectives, as well as general papers in Cultural Studies.

The conference welcomes proposals for papers or panels that address the theme of Cultural Transformations from a diverse and inclusive range of perspectives, as well as general papers in Cultural Studies.

Further information regarding conference streams, deadlines and abstract submission will soon be available on this website. In the interim, for more information, please email the organising team here: csaaconf2019@gmail.com

ISFAR sessions at the Australian Historical Association Conference

ISFAR is pleased to announce that it will convene a French Australian Relations stream at the Australian Historical Association’s annual conference, which will be held in Toowoomba, Queensland from 8-12 July 2019. The conference theme this year is ‘Local Communities, Global Networks’. For further details and the Call for Papers, click here.

Please direct any questions to Pauline Georgelin at isfarinc@gmail.com

ASFS Conference evening with Rodney Saint Eloi at AF Perth Tuesday 04 December 6pm

  Come at the Alliance Francaise to Meet and greet with award winning Haitian poet Rodney Saint Eloi.
The conference will be followed by Q&A and book signing session.

Tuesday 4 December.
6pm at Alliance Française de Perth, Nedlands

FREE
RSVP essential
HERE

Drinks and nibbles

Tickets: https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/conference-with-poet-rodney-st-eloi-tickets-52475105453?utm_term=eventurl_text

2nd Colloquium of the Institute for the Study of French Australian Relations “French Contributions to Australian Life”

Second Colloquium of the Institute for the Study of French Australian Relations

“French Contributions to Australian Life”

University of Adelaide

Thursday 27 September 2018

The programme for the above conference is now available. It features a keynote address by Emeritus Professor Colin Nettelbeck (University of Melbourne) on the topic “France and the French in Australia’s growth to nationhood: 1914-1945”. There will also be a Round Table devoted to reflections on the centenary commemorations of the Great War. The conference is free of charge but presenters and others wishing to attend are asked to register for catering purposes by clicking here.

The conference is organised by the Department of French Studies at the University of Adelaide, which is celebrating its centenary in 2018. See here for the full programme of its French Centenary events. Professor Nettelbeck’s keynote address will double as a public lecture in the French Centenary series. This particular event aims to celebrate the French Department’s alumni, who will be particularly encouraged to attend, and of whom Colin Nettelbeck is one of the most distinguished.

‘The work of memory’? Historical thinking and education in France

The Australian Centre for Public History presents

SEMINAR: ‘The work of memory’? Historical thinking and education in France

Tuesday 12th June 4.30-6pm UTS, Sydney
Building 10, Level 14, Rm 201

Alexandre Dessingué (Stavanger University Norway)

Through his notion about ‘the work of memory’, Paul Ricoeur expresses the desire to make our relationship to the past an active, even a problematic one, and not to be the passive spectator that many commemorations encourage. The problem is not simply to regret that middle school or high school students are entirely absent from ceremonies commemorating May 8 or November 11. The real question is the one of the meaning to be given to past events. How can the past be perceived as a resource for the present and the future? What is the purpose of history and history teaching?

The city of Dunkirk and its inhabitants in Northern France have always been at the crossroads of Europe and for this reason were hard hit by both World Wars. In this presentation, we will have a closer look at firsthand accounts of city nursing home residents and ask with them how memories work, what they tell us about our relation we make with the past and why we should consider individual and collective memories as an important part of a critical and active work on/with history?


Bio
Alexandre Dessingué is Professor of Literacy Studies and History Education at the University of Stavanger, Norway. His research interests focus on cultural and collective memory, cultural representations of WW1, WW2, the Holocaust and of the colonial period, literary and memory theory, critical literacy/awareness and history education. He has published several articles, books and book chapters in the field of cultural memory studies and cultural history. His last publications include a co-edited volume with Jay Winter Beyond Memory: Silence and the Aesthetics of Remembrance (2016) and the book chapters “Paul Ricoeur: Understanding the Past and Writing the Future” (Routledge, 2017) and “The Ethics of Memory” in My Heart of Darkness” (Verlag, 2017).

 

CFP: ISFAR “French Contributions to Australian Life”

ISFAR logoSecond Conference of the Institute for the Study of French Australian Relations

“French Contributions to Australian Life”

University of Adelaide

Thursday 27 September 2018

Call for Papers

Following a successful first conference in Adelaide in December 2016, the Institute for the Study of French Australian Relations is pleased to announce that its second conference will be held on 27 September 2018, also in Adelaide. It will feature a keynote address by Emeritus Professor Colin Nettelbeck (University of Melbourne), on the topic “France and the French in Australia’s growth to nationhood: 1914-1945”.

The theme for the conference is to be taken in its broadest sense, encompassing fields such as the cultural, historical, social, economic, educational and political contributions that French people, groups and institutions have made to Australian life. The notion of “contribution” can also be taken in a critical sense, to refer to the part played by a person, group, institution or idea in bringing about an advance or change, in positive terms or not. Possible topics include:

  • people
  • organisations (eg the French-Australian Chamber of Commerce)
  • family history
  • literature and the arts
  • fashion
  • business
  • pedagogical ideas and practices

Paper proposals of around 200 words are now invited and should be sent to John West-Sooby (john.westsooby@adelaide.edu.au) by 29 June 2018. Note that, following the conference, presenters will be invited to submit written versions of their papers, in scholarly article form, for publication in ISFAR’s journal, The French Australian Review, subject to peer review.

There will be no charge for the conference but presenters and others wishing to attend are asked to register for catering purposes by clicking here.

The conference is organised by the Department of French Studies at the University of Adelaide, which is celebrating its centenary in 2018. See here for the full programme of its French Centenary events.

Note: The keynote address, by Emeritus Professor Colin Nettelbeck, will be scheduled for the end of the day, from 6.00 to 7.00 pm, and will double as a public lecture in the French Centenary series. It will be preceded by a cocktail reception aimed at celebrating the French Department’s alumni, who will be particularly encouraged to attend, and of whom Colin Nettelbeck is one of our most distinguished.