Émission radio dédiée à Christchurch (en français)

Chers collègues, chers amis, 
 
Afin de commémorer les événements tragiques à Christchurch du 15 mars dernier, nous avons dédié notre émission radio de « Paris s’éveille » (sur la radio communautaire de Plains FM) à notre ville et à la Journée internationale de la poésie. Vous trouverez ci-dessous le message publicitaire qui circule sur les réseaux sociaux. Si vous souhaitez écouter l’émission en podcast, vous pouvez y accéder sur le site suivant :
 
Dans cette émission, nous remercions officiellement l’ASFS pour son soutien et sa solidarité. Un grand merci aux collègues de l’ASFS pour les messages personnels que vous nous avez envoyés.
 
 
Tonight’s show is a very special one: it is dedicated to Christchurch on International Poetry Day. Still recovering from devastating earthquakes for the last 8 years, Christchurch was victim to a tragic event that was anything but natural. Tonight, beyond the language of radicalization and hate speech that has received much media attention, we have preferred to respond with the power of words grounded in love, resistance, and tolerance.
 
Tune in this evening for a celebration of language and poems from French and Francophone writers from across the Francosphere. “Paris s’éveille” is honoured to be sharing poems dedicated to Christchurch following the tragic events of March 15 from world-renowned poets such as Katy Rémy, Tanella Boni, Maggy de Coster, and Hédi Bouraoui, including hitherto unpublished material.
 
En solidarité – Kia kaha,
Antonio Viselli
Antonio Viselli, PhD

Lecturer/French Subject Coordinator 
School of Language, Social, and Political Sciences
University of Canterbury
Private Bag 4800
Christchurch
New Zealand
+64 3 369 4540

Nick Hewitt, in memorium

NickHewitt

Nick Hewitt at ASFS 2016 in Adelaide

from Alistair Rolls and Greg Hainge


Greg and I started our journeys at Nottingham University as undergraduates in October 1990. They were days when the university experience was rather different, and I for one, as a first-in-family student from a working-class family was entirely out of my comfort zone. And I couldn’t have been happier. Among all the personalities who made up the French Department at Nottingham in those days (my memories are of academics with brilliant minds and teachers with “stage presence”) few lecturers could command a room better than Nick Hewitt. He was renowned for his dry and cutting wit but, above all, for his ability to fill students with awe while also – and this is a gift – getting his message through purposefully and didactically. I remember going into my final year knowing the department’s professor for his occasional lectures in team-taught literature courses and was surprised by the way that he engaged students in his courses on Céline (I read both Voyage au bout de la nuit and Mort à crédit twice that year, and I suspect that Greg would have done the same) and the popular culture of the Fourth Republic, but also his classes on journalistic French rhythm, which marked me deeply and which I have tried, with less success, to incorporate in my own language classes since. Greg went on to do a PhD on Céline, while I followed my interest in Vian, and we both had Nick as supervisor. It was in those years (1994 to 1998) that I discovered a true kindness that some people may not have suspected beneath the often confrontingly intellectual exterior. He had a reputation for not suffering fools gladly, but he suffered me… And he supported me, often quietly and behind the scenes, and guided me to a successful outcome, something for which I shall be forever grateful. The most complimentary words he ever said about my work were not said to me, but instead to my parents, on the day of my PhD graduation ceremony. They felt more out of place there than I did (and to this day I hesitate as I walk onto university campuses for the first time), and those words meant more to them than he perhaps realized. That was very much a mark of the man.

Of his academic works, I shall always remember The Golden Age of Louis-Ferdinand Céline (Bloomsbury, 1987), France and the Mass Media (Palgrave Macmillan, 1991), which he edited Brian Rigby, which I read as an undergraduate, and his article on La Nausée, “Looking for Annie” (Journal of European Studies, 1982), which was a pioneering study of the novel’s other, non-philosophical side. Lastly, having discussed its progress with him over the years, I am yet to read Montmartre: A Cultural History. I plan to read it now, but it will be with a heavy heart. I owe Nick Hewitt a great deal and I shall miss his mentorship, his wit and his unfailing support.


“Nous voici encore seuls. Tout cela est si lent, si lourd, si triste… Bientôt je serai vieux. Et ce sera enfin fini.”

How else to begin a reflection on the life of Nick Hewitt than with these opening lines of Louis-Ferdinand Céline’s second novel, Mort à credit. Given the fundamentally biological, medical vision of existence that permeates le Docteur Destouches’ literary universe, death is the only possible “vérité de ce monde” (Voyage au bout de la nuit). Given this, given the time that I have spent pondering such matters, thanks to Nick who introduced me to the works of Céline, one might think that news of his passing would be less of a shock, would seem less unreal.

More the fool me, for Bardamu continues his musing on death as follows: “La vérité de ce monde c’est la mort. Il faut choisir, mourir ou mentir. Je n’ai jamais pu me tuer moi”. Death, then, is our only truth, but it is one we attempt to dissimulate by telling stories that pretend this is not so, that there is some way to offset the crushing absurdity of a life thus defined, to laugh in the face of this very bleakest of visions and thus have the will to carry on living.

Now then is a time for telling stories, for remembering fondly how Nick lived and worked according to this kind of principle.

In his academic writing, Nick was an exemplary storyteller with a flair for readability that unfortunately didn’t always rub off on his doctoral students – don’t worry, I’m having a dig at myself, Alistair! His work The Golden Age of Louis-Ferdinand Céline remains to my mind the best critical work on Céline’s novels in the English language; it uncovered archival information never previously published that radically changed the interpretation of some key aspects of Céline’s novels, presented an incredibly rich and complex analysis of the texts that unpacked their deep and irreverent engagement with the (at the time) emergent theory of psychoanalysis, and yet managed to remain very accessible. His biography of Céline published with Blackwell went further still, being meticulous in its attention to detail and scholarly rigour while being a real page-turner.

That he managed so successfully to walk this fine line between erudition, rigour and readability is perhaps due to two things. Firstly, as Alistair notes, he had a reputation for not suffering fools gladly or, to put this slightly differently, he was not afraid to cut to the chase and call a cat a cat. This propensity for brutal honesty could be confronting to say the least: having read through what I thought was the final version of my thesis, I remember him saying to me, “it’s great, but it’s not a thesis”. Having picked myself up from the floor, our subsequent discussion about what precisely that meant remains one of the most valuable conversations I have had for thinking about my own writing and the advice that I provide to my students.

As well as talking and writing straight, though, the other key to the success of Nick’s work is the obvious love of the material that can be felt in his writing. This extends from his early work on Céline, through his mid-career work on other writers whose political positioning provides an alternative history of the inter-war years, perhaps reaching its apogee in his late career work on places in France dear to his heart. As surely befits its subject matter, Colin Jones concludes his review of Nick’s 2017 volume Montmartre: A Cultural History by noting that, “there is pleasure aplenty in this subtle and highly evocative account”. Let us then hope that we will soon have the opportunity to find more pleasure still in the pages of the book on Marseille that Nick was working on. “I’m in the final stages of sending the manuscript for the Marseille book off to the publishers, but, at the moment, it’s more or less on schedule”, he wrote to me in January. And this is wonderful news indeed, because if the stories we tell make life bearable while we are here, they also provide those who survive us, who cared for us and thus mourn us some small consolation when, finally, we can lie no more and must face the truth.

ASFS/AJFS Postgraduate Prize 2019

The Australian Society for French Studies and the Australian Journal of French Studies are pleased to announce the fifth annual co-sponsored ASFS/AJFS Postgraduate Prize.

A prize of $500 will be awarded for the best article (4,000-6,000 words inc. notes) by a postgraduate student on any aspect of French Studies (except French language studies). The prize will be awarded at the annual ASFS Conference in Sydney https://australiansocietyforfrenchstudies.com/events/asfs-conference/ in December 2019, and the winning article will be published in a ‘miscellaneous’ issue of AJFS.

Applicants must be enrolled in a research higher degree at an Australian university and be a member of ASFS. Previous prize recipients are not eligible to submit an article. Articles may be written in English or French and must be presented according to AJFSstyle guidelines (see http://online.liverpooluniversitypress.co.uk/loi/ajfs or http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/australian-journal-french-studies/. They will be assessed by a joint ASFS/AJFS judging committee which may call upon relevant expertise in its deliberations.

The deadline for submissions for the prize is 30 June 2019. The winner will be announced in December 2019.

Submissions and enquiries relating to the ASFS/AJFS Postgraduate Prize should be directed to ASFS’s Postgraduate Officer, Sophie Patrick at sophie.patrick@une.edu.au.

Véronique Duché, President of ASFS
Brian Nelson, Editor of AJFS

CFP: ASFS 2019 Making and Breaking Rules in Sydney

Australian Society for French Studies Annual Conference 2019

Making and Breaking Rules

University of New England – Western Sydney University

Location: UNE Sydney

10-12 December 2019

When we speak, write and act, when we produce and interpret culture, we are consciously or unconsciously following rules of various kinds. But what does it mean to follow a rule? What are the consequences of failing to do so? Who has the power to institute and enforce rules? How can rules be modified or dissolved?

These general questions can be sharpened in specific domains of French, Francophone, and Comparative studies, interpreted in the widest possible way:

  • how do generic conventions shape our expectations and guide our reception of literary works, films, television drama and other cultural products?
  • how can generic conventions encode social values?
  • how do specific works break with conventions and what kinds of impact can this have?
  • is cultural innovation always a matter of breaking rules?
  • how do new rules arise and spread?
  • how has the history of France, and of French colonization and decolonization, shaped specific approaches to rewriting social and political rules?
  • how can a universalism of rules (“one rule for all”) correct or reinforce injustices, depending on the situation?
  • to what degree is accuracy and aptness in language use and translation a matter of conformity to rules?
  • when and how should rules of grammar and usage be taught in the language classroom?
  • how should non-standard grammar and usage be presented in teaching?
  • what effects have regulatory bodies had on the evolution of French as it is used throughout the Francophone world?

Participants are encouraged to reflect on rules broadly conceived, as:

  • laws and regulations;
  • political programs and platforms;
  • norms of ability and disability;
  • social conventions;
  • etiquette and politeness;
  • gender constructs;
  • religious precepts;
  • generic conventions;
  • formal constraints;
  • research protocols;
  • conflicting epistemologies;

and to consider a range of rule-making and -breaking practices:

  • prescription and legislation;
  • the making explicit and codification of existing practices;
  • preservation and recovery of traditional wisdom;
  • discretion in the application of rules;
  • civil disobedience;
  • deviance, deviation and clinamen;
  • transgression;
  • tradition and innovation;
  • law enforcement and crime.

We invite proposals for individual papers (20 minutes) and for panels (three papers of 20 minutes each) related to the theme of making and breaking rules. We will also consider proposals that do not relate directly to this theme.

Please send your proposal of 250 words for papers in English or French, or suggestion of panels, to vgosetti@une.edu.au by Monday 6 May 2019.

Important dates

  • Deadline for submitting proposals for papers/panels: 6 May 2019
  • Notification of acceptance: June 2019
  • Early-bird registration: ends 4 September 2019
  • Full registration: 5 September 2019 onwards
  • Postgraduate session: Monday 9 December 2019

Conference Organising Committee
Chris Andrews (Western Sydney University), Valentina Gosetti & Sophie Patrick (University of New England)

The ASFS Annual Conference 2019 will blend with the conference

The Effects of the Oulipo: Impact, Continuities, Appropriations, Reactions
11-13 December 2019

Organising committee: Chris Andrews (Western Sydney University), Christelle Reggiani (Université de Paris IV), Christophe Reig (Université de Perpignan), Hermes Salceda (Universidad de Vigo).


Colloque annuel de l’Australian Society for French Studies 2019

Règles et dérèglements

University of New England – Western Sydney University

UNE Sydney

10-12 décembre 2019

Lorsque nous parlons, écrivons et agissons, lorsque nous produisons et interprétons la culture, nous suivons consciemment ou inconsciemment des règles de différentes sortes. Mais que veut dire suivre une règle ? Quelles sont les conséquences de ne pas le faire? Qui a le pouvoir d’instituer et de faire respecter les règles ? Comment les règles peuvent-elles être modifiées ou dissoutes ?

Ces questions générales pourront être affinées dans des domaines spécifiques au sein des études françaises, francophones et comparées, interprétées de la manière la plus large possible :

  • Comment les conventions génériques façonnent-elles nos attentes et guident-elles notre réception d’œuvres littéraires, de films, de séries télévisées et d’autres produits culturels ?
  • comment les conventions génériques peuvent-elles encoder des valeurs sociales ?
  • comment des œuvres spécifiques rompent-elles avec les conventions et quels types d’impact cela peut-il avoir ?
  • l’innovation culturelle est-elle toujours une question de violation des règles ?
  • comment les nouvelles règles apparaissent-elles et se propagent-elles ?
  • comment l’histoire de la France, de la colonisation et de la décolonisation françaises a-t-elle façonné des approches spécifiques de réécriture des règles sociales et politiques ?
  • comment un universalisme de règles (« une règle pour tous ») peut-il corriger ou renforcer les injustices, selon la situation ?
  • dans quelle mesure l’exactitude et l’aptitude à utiliser une langue et à traduire sont-elles une question de conformité aux règles ?
  • quand et comment les règles de grammaire et d’utilisation doivent-elles être enseignées en classe de langue ?
  • comment faut-il présenter la grammaire et l’usage non standard dans l’enseignement ?
  • quels effets les organismes de réglementation ont-ils eu sur l’évolution du français tel qu’il est utilisé dans le monde francophone ?

Les participants sont encouragés à réfléchir sur les règles au sens le plus large, dans différents domaines possibles :

  • lois et règlements
  • programmes et plateformes politiques
  • normes d’aptitude et d’invalidité
  • conventions sociales
  • étiquette et politesse
  • les concepts de genre
  • préceptes religieux
  • conventions génériques
  • contraintes formelles
  • protocoles de recherche
  • épistémologies en conflit

et envisager un éventail de pratiques d’établissement de règles et de rupture :

  • prescription et législation
  • explicitation et codification des pratiques existantes
  • préservation et récupération de la sagesse traditionnelle
  • discrétion dans l’application des règles
  • désobéissance civile
  • déviance, déviation et clinamen
  • la transgression
  • tradition et innovation
  • application de la loi et criminalité

Nous sollicitons des propositions de communications individuelles (20 minutes) et de panels (trois communications de 20 minutes chacune) sur le thème de l’établissement et de la violation des règles. Nous examinerons également les propositions qui ne concernent pas directement ce thème.

Veuillez envoyer votre proposition de 250 mots pour des communications en anglais ou en français, ou une suggestion de panel, à vgosetti@une.edu.au avant le lundi 6 mai 2019.

Dates

  • Date limite de soumission des propositions de communications / panels : 6 mai 2019
  • Notification d’acceptation : juin 2019
  • Inscription early-bird : se termine le 4 septembre 2019
  • Inscription complète : à partir du 5 septembre 2019
  • Séance dédiée aux doctorants : lundi 9 décembre 2019

Comité d’organisation

Chris Andrews (Western Sydney University), Valentina Gosetti et Sophie Patrick (University of New England)

 

Le colloque annuel de l’ASFS 2019 accompagnera le colloque:
Les effets de l’Oulipo : Impact, continuités, détournements, réactions
11-13 décembre 2019

Comité d’organisation : Chris Andrews (Western Sydney University), Christelle Reggiani (Université de Paris IV), Christophe Reig (Université de Perpignan), Hermes Salceda (Universidad de Vigo)

 

Congratulations ASFS Honorary Life Members Brian Nelson and Colin Nettelbeck

At the ASFS 2018 annual meeting at University of Western Australia (Perth) this year, two long time members of our organisation received honorary life memberships to mark our twenty-fifth anniversary. Congratulations to Professor Brian Nelson (Monash) and Professor Colin Nettelbeck (Melbourne)!

Professor Nelson was instrumental in founding ASFS in 1993, and both he and Professor Nettelbeck have made outstanding contributions to French Studies across their careers. We are honoured to have them amongst our members.

brian-nelson-july-2016-web

Professor Brian Nelson

colin n.

Professor Colin Nettelbeck

ASFS/AJFS Postgraduate Prize CFP 2018

The Australian Society for French Studies and the Australian Journal of French Studies are pleased to announce the fourth annual co-sponsored ASFS/AJFS Postgraduate Prize.

A prize of $500 will be awarded for the best article (4,000-6,000 words inc. notes) by a postgraduate student on any aspect of French Studies (except French language studies). The prize will be awarded at the annual conference of ASFS in Perth in December 2018, and the winning article will be published in a ‘miscellaneous’ issue of AJFS.

Applicants must be enrolled in a research higher degree at an Australian university and be a member of ASFS. Previous prize recipients are not eligible to submit an article. Articles may be written in English or French and must be presented according to AJFS style guidelines (see http://online.liverpooluniversitypress.co.uk/loi/ajfs or http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/australian-journal-french-studies/. They will be assessed by a joint ASFS/AJFS judging committee which may call upon relevant expertise in its deliberations.

The deadline for submissions for the inaugural prize is 31 July 2018. The winner will be announced in December 2018.

Submissions and enquiries relating to the ASFS/AJFS Postgraduate Prize should be directed to ASFS’s Postgraduate Officer, Sophie Patrick at sophie.patrick@une.edu.au.

AJFS 55.1 on Mobility and Migration, now available

The latest volume of the Australian Journal of French Studies is a “deuxième volet” of articles emanating from the 2016 ASFS conference in Adelaide. Congratulations to the editors and contributors who are members of ASFS.

 

Australian Journal of French Studies 55:1 (2018)

Mobility and Migration

Table of Contents

Natalie Edwards, Christopher Hogarth and Ben McCann, “Mobility and Migration in France and the Francophone World”

Natalie Edwards, “Virginie Despentes’s Mobile Women in Apocalypse Bébé

Kathryn Kleppinger, “Mobilities, Migrations, and Mysteries in Maurice Gouiran’s Marseille Polars

Clara Sitbon, “Fluctuations auctoriales au sein du hoax littéraire”

Bénédicte André, “‘Il y a toujours l’Autre’: Towards a Photomosaic Reading of Otherness in Island Short Story Collections”

Catherine Gilbert,Mobilising Memory: Rwandan Women Genocide Survivors in the Diaspora”

Alexandra Kurmann, “Aller-retour-détour. Transdiasporic Nomadism and Navigating Literary Prescription in the Work of Kim Thúy and Thanh-Van Tran-Nhut”

Sonia Wilson, “A Room of One’s Own? Gender and the voyage immobile in Leïla Sebbar’sVoyage en Algéries autour de ma chambre

Charles Forsdick, Afterword

Book Reviews (3)