CFP: Women in French Postgraduate/ECR International Symposium

Call for Papers

The Immersive Potential of Literature and Hybrid Media in the 20th and 21st Centuries

Women in French Postgraduate/ECR International Symposium

Symposium: Wednesday, January 12 to Friday, January 14, 2022

Proposals due: 17 September 2021.

Keynote Speaker: Professor Diana Holmes (Leeds).

Women in French invites papers for a virtual international symposium focusing on immersion in women’s literature and hybrid media (including photo-texts, bande dessinée, theatre, spoken word, blogging, other internet-based media, etc.), with a focus on immersivity as both a pleasurable and productive feature. This online event welcomes presentations from postgraduate students and early career researchers working on questions of gender or feminism in French studies.

The immersive potential of literature and other media has become particularly apparent during periods of lockdown, when picking up a good book became a crucial way of escaping from the world and, conversely, of feeling more deeply connected to others while we remained physically distanced. Others, however, have simply not had time to engage with literature or other media because of increasing workloads, felt especially keenly by women across the world having to balance home-schooling, télétravail and domestic responsibilities. At the very least, people have had to choose between which sources to read, watch or listen, which calls into question the value of specifically immersive literatures and hybrid media. What can these works afford us in terms of pleasure, enjoyment, personal wellbeing, interpersonal connection, cultural acumen, and political awareness, particularly from a feminist perspective? What gives rise to the immersive potential of literature and hybrid media in the first place? 

These questions build on a long history of efforts to bridge the divide between popular and academic reading practices; a division that is inherently gendered. France in particular fosters a literary culture preoccupied with the satisfying challenges of formalism, which is thus regarded as sophisticated and cerebral (Holmes and Looseley 2013, 6). Consequently, a literary experience that is associated with pleasure, enjoyment and immersivity is framed as a frivolous, unintelligent ‘feminine’ approach to literature (Holmes 2018). Yet, these modes of reading are arguably more culturally democratic and representative of broader societal values and interests. It is for this reason, among others, that a renewed interest in the ‘middlebrow’ has recently gained in critical momentum, a field of scholarship that places great stock in the value of immersive literatures and media.

In her recent study, Middlebrow Matters (2018), Diana Holmes argues that middlebrow matters precisely because its immersive and plot-driven narrative have the potential to ‘extend [one’s] cognitive and emotional range beyond that of direct, lived experience, enabling an experimental assent to alternative ways of seeing and reacting to the world’ (17). In this way, the immersive potential of literature, as well as other media, can allow for both personal and interpersonal transformation; immersivity can enable us to blur the boundaries between the public and the private – what Judith Butler calls a ‘threshold zone’ (Butler and Athanasiou, 2013) – and to ‘identif[y] with [an]other who is not like ourself’ (Huston 2008, 182-183). Immersivity is an exemplar of what reading fiction can achieve, which allows us to simulate other people’s experiences based on our own ‘repertoire’, ‘encyclopedia’ or ‘experiential background’ (Alderson-Day et al 2017, 99). This symposium therefore aims to explore the pleasurable, productive and transformative capacity of immersivity, taking into consideration contemporary concerns and applications, and to extend the study of immersive literature to a broader consideration of hybrid media.
Francophone women writers have been and remain at the forefront of such liminal and re-creative writing and expression. These authors use an immersive experience in the service of socio-political or interpersonal comment, with examples including Amélie Nothomb’s narration of eating disorders, most notably in Biographie de la faim (2004), Kim Thuy’s description of migration across her corpus (Ru 2009; À toi 2011; Mãn 2020), Annie Ernaux’s representation of an unashamedly feminine desire in her photo-text L’Usage de la photo (2005), co-authored with Marc Marie, and Nancy Huston’s Le Club des miracles relatifs (2016), which invites a visceral response to the climate emergency and the global North’s investment in fossil fuels. Other examples may relate to the ways that authors use the formally immersive aesthetic of the archive to plunge readers/viewers into a labyrinthe of material. This use of immersivity appears in Leïla Sebbar’s photo-textual series Mes Algéries en France (2004; 2005; 2008; 2018), in which she enacts a postcolonial return to the origins of her own and others’ identities. In a slightly different direction, an archival poetics emerges in Nathalie Léger’s trilogy of texts (L’Exposition 2008; Supplément à la vie de Barbara Loden 2012; La Robe blanche 2018), works which layer reflections on art to, among other things, interrogate the ways that art can assist women in understanding their own identity and in escaping the dominant and dominating power of the male gaze and other means of prescribing women’s societal roles.

We invite papers that explore literatures and hybrid media using immersivity, plot-driven narrative, realism and mimesis, or other textual modes of engaging readers to connect with broader cultural or political concerns, and in particular those that affect female-identifying readers. Papers may also focus on haptic and affective representation, as immersive experience may be said to involve the body or to appeal to the emotions and thus a lived experience of the world. 

Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:
• Pleasures of reading/the text 
• Networks and mediation 
• Escapism as a theme in female authored narrative/works
• Divergence and convergence
• Feminist discourse and its relation to both marginal and popular culture 
• The materiality of the book 
• The marketing of immersive fiction
• Literary prizes and questions of gender and inclusivity
• Relationships between the work and the body (haptic or affective qualities)
• Political or cultural messages delivered through the immersive qualities of a work (mimesis, plot-driven narrative, etc.)
• Immersive aesthetics or poetics
• Immersion as a theme itself in immersive works (e.g. in water, the archive)

Proposals are welcome in both English and French.

Please send abstracts to wif.ecr.symposium@gmail.com by 17 September 2021. Individual papers will be 15-minutes long. All submissions should be accompanied by a short (100-word) biography of the presenter(s). Please ensure that your abstracts and biographies are included in the same document, that the title of this document includes your name, and that you specify the time zone that you will be presenting from:
• Individual proposals should be no more than 250 words.
• Panel proposals should not exceed 1,000 words, and should include a brief description of the panel and of the individual papers included in the panel.
Please do not hesitate to send us any queries, and we hope to hear from you soon.

With best wishes from the organisers,

Pooja Booluck (British Columbia), Françoise Campbell (IMLR), Polly Galis (Bristol), Beth Kearney (Queensland) and Eric Wistrom (Wisconsin-Madison)

References

Alderson-Day, Ben, Marci Bernini and Charles Fernyhough. 2017. ‘Uncharted Features and Dynamics of Reading: Voices, Characters, and Crossing of Experiences’. Consciousness and Cognition 49: 98-109.

Butler, Judith, and Athena Athanasiou. 2013. Dispossession: The Performative in the Political. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Ernaux, Annie and Marc Marie. 2005. L’Usage de la photo. Paris: Gallimard.

Holmes, Diana. 2018. Middlebrow Matters: Women’s Reading and the Literary Canon in France since the Belle Époque. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press.

Holmes, Diana and David Looseley (eds). 2013. Imagining the Popular: highbrow, lowbrow and middlebrow in contemporary French culture. Manchester: Manchester University Press. 

Holmes, Diana, David Platten, Loic Artiaga and Jacques Migozzi (eds). 2013. Finding the Plot: Storytelling in popular fictions. Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publications.

Huston, Nancy. 2016. Le Club des miracles relatifs. Arles: Actes Sud.

Huston, Nancy. 2008. L’Espèce fabulatrice. Arles: Actes Sud.

Léger, Nathalie. 2008. L’Exposition. Paris: P. O. L.

Léger, Nathalie. 2012. Supplément à la vie de Barbara Loden. Paris: P. O. L.

Léger, Nathalie. 2018. La Robe blanche. Paris: P. O. L.

Nothomb, Amélie. 2004. Biographie de la faim. Paris: Albin Michel.

Sebbar, Leïla. 2004. Mes Algéries en France. Saint-Pourçain-sur-Sioule: Bleu autour.

Sebbar, Leïla. 2005. Journal de mes Algéries en France. Saint-Pourçain-sur-Sioule: Bleu autour.

Sebbar, Leïla. 2008. Voyage en Algéries autour de ma chambre. Saint-Pourçain-sur-Sioule: Bleu autour.

Sebbar, Leïla. 2018. Le Pays de ma mère, voyage en Frances. Saint-Pourçain-sur-Sioule: Bleu autour.

Thùy, Kim. 2009. Ru. Québec: Libre Expression.

Thùy, Kim et Janovjak, Pascal. 2011. À toi. Québec: Libre Expression.

Thùy, Kim. 2020. Mãn. Québec: Libre Expression.

New French Studies Seminar Series: DRAFT

DRAFT is a new research seminar series organised by the departments of French and francophone studies at the University of Sydney, the University of Melbourne and the University of New England.

As part of this initiative, Australia’s researchers from various disciplines are invited to participate and share their current research activities relating to French and francophone studies. The seminars are first and foremost an opportunity to give visibility to research in progress and to facilitate new collaborations across universities in Australia. Instead of presenting communications based on research that is already published and disseminated, presenters discuss and exchange ideas about their work in progress. The DRAFT seminar series aims to promote collaborative and interdisciplinary projects involving academics from different universities whose current research activities complement each other, thus fostering future joint publications and/or grant ventures.

If you would like to discuss your research in progress at one of our monthly seminars, please send a title and a short abstract (150-200 words) to draft.seminarseries@gmail.com

Follow DRAFT on Facebook here.

Organising Committee

Bertrand Bourgeois (University of Melbourne)

Michelle Royer (The University of Sydney)

Nathalie Ségeral (The University of Sydney)

Victoria Souliman (University of New England)

Léa Vuong (The University of Sydney)

Call for Papers: ASFS 2021 Conference, ‘Un.Sited’

Australian Society for French Studies Conference 2021

8-10 December 2021

Un.sited: “Sites” in French Studies

Online conference

Hosted by the French Discipline, School of Language and Cultures

University of Queensland

We acknowledge the traditional owners of the lands on which the university stands.

It is intended that scheduling will accommodate speakers from a range of time zones – from other states in Australia and around the world.

Confirmed plenary speakers:

Professor Charles Forsdick, University of Liverpool

Professor Celeste Kinginger, Penn State University

Professor Valérie Loichot, Emory University

The label “French Studies” is applied to research and teaching in a range of disciplines united by the common thread of interest in phenomena related to particular sites, those where French is spoken. The notion of site, one from which practitioners are most usually distanced, is thus a primary enabler of our work, but is taken up in a wide range of ways. Rather than being neutral places, spaces or localities, sites carry specific meaning or have particular functions that may vary between disciplines and individuals. The significance of “sites” has been underscored by the restrictions on mobility enforced in response to the pandemic: many of us have found ourselves “un-sited”, removed from a specific point of contact, our sites more than ever out of sight. Yet we have also sought out alternative (often virtual) spaces with which to engage. New locations have become available through Zoom and our own homes have taken on new functions. 

Therefore, at a time when mobility and access have been restricted and transformed in ways unimaginable a few years ago, in this conference we want to explore the notion of “site” and what it means in the various disciplines represented in French Studies through papers which illustrate its mobilisation (papers drawing on specific sites) or tackle the significance of “site” directly. How do specific physical spaces (their existence, accessibility or inaccessibility) become meaningful for your work, research, teaching and identity? How are notions of particular places given value? How do certain sites take on meaning through historical or sociocultural events? How do certain spaces exclude or include particular socio-cultural groups? Do they take on different meaning depending on identity categories? What alternative spaces have now become available?

Presentations might consider:

  • sites of authenticity
  • sites of imagination
  • sites of learning
  • sites of marginalisation/ marginalised sites
  • sites of memory
  • sites of pleasure
  • sites of suffering and infection
  • sites of tourism
  • sites of work
  • archives; archaeology
  • fieldwork
  • filming on location
  • imagined or mythic sites
  • literary and cinematic topographies
  • para/sites: questions of contiguity, interdisciplinarity, intersectionality
  • regional variations
  • student im/mobility; virtual mobility
  • télétravail and WFH
  • terroir
  • universities as transnational spaces

We invite proposals – in French or in English – for:

  • Individual research papers: presentations of 15 minutes, followed by 10 / 15 minutes of discussion.
  • Panels: three x 15-minute papers, followed by discussion.
  • Roundtable discussions: these might relate to research practice, to teaching practice, to language policy (for example).

As is the usual ASFS practice, we will consider proposals on topics other than the conference theme, within the constraints of the programme.

Proposals to be sent to https://forms.gle/7w3KejQN3J4FSwfP9 by 30 July 2021

Conference emails: asfs2021@uq.edu.au.

Registration: (Payment details to be provided later)

$30 flat rate for all attendees

This nominal fee will contribute to the costs of administrative and technical support. The Australian Society for French Studies will also sponsor the conference and you are therefore encouraged to renew your membership or become a member:

Postgraduates: $10

Sessional staff; retired; unwaged: $20

Fulltime staff: $30

Organizing committee:

Barbara Hanna; Joe Hardwick; Amy Hubbell; Jenny Davis Barnett; Beth Kearney; Peter Cowley

ASFS/AJFS Postgraduate Essay Prize 2021

The Australian Society for French Studies and the Australian Journal of French Studies are pleased to announce the seventh annual co-sponsored ASFS/AJFS Postgraduate Essay Prize.

A prize of AU$500 will be awarded to the best article (5,000 to 6,500 words including notes) on any aspect of French Studies (except French language Studies) by a postgraduate student. The winning essay will be published in the Australian Journal of French Studies.

Submission Guidelines

  • Entries are open to anyone enrolled in a Masters or PhD in an Australian or New Zealand university on the date of the submission deadline.
  • Essays on any aspect of French and Francophone Studies (except French language Studies) will be considered.
  • Essays must be an original piece of work not already under consideration for publication elsewhere.
  • Essays must not exceed 6,000 words (6,500 including notes) and must be presented according to the Australian Journal of French Studies guidelines:
  • Essays must be anonymised and not include the candidate’s name, that of their supervisors or institution.
  • Essays should be submitted to the Postgraduate Officer along with the Submission Form:

A panel of three members of the Society will evaluate all applications. The panel members will be selected from institutions other than those at which the applicants are candidates. All applicants will receive written feedback from the panel.

The following prizes will be awarded to the winner:

  • Publication of the winning essay in Australian Journal of French Studies, subject to the journal’s refereeing.
  • A certificate award at the annual ASFS conference
  • A cash prize of AU$500 jointly awarded by the ASFS and AJFS.

Deadline for submissions: 31 July 2021.  

Submissions and enquiries should be directed to ASFS’s Postgraduate Officer, Clara Sitbon (clara.sitbon@sydney.edu.au)

2021 FATFA Conference Online and In-Person April 17-18

ASFS members may be interested in the upcoming Federation of Associations of Teachers of French in Australia (FATFA) Conference.

The 2021 Conference will be running in a hybrid format online and in-person in Brisbane from April 17-18. The conference will include:

  • Plenary speeches by Florence Boulard, Gianfranco Conti and Joe Dale,
  • Workshops and presentations that are interactive, informative and varied ,
  • Recordings of all sessions available for download for one month post-conference,
  • In-person attendance includes conference function at Cloudland on Saturday 17th.

The members’ price is for members of any state language teachers association. For more information or to make any additional presentation proposals, email Barbara Hanna at b.hanna@uq.edu.au. More information is available on the website at https://fatfamltaqconferen.wixsite.com/website.

Deadline extended to 25 September: Australian Society for French Studies 2020 Conference (‘Dis/connexion’, 3-4 December)

ASFS Conference Banner 2020

We are pleased to extend the deadline for proposals for the Australian Society for French Studies 2020 Virtual Conference, until Friday September 25. We will advise successful applicants by early October and attendees and speakers will be required to become members/ renew their membership of the Society by November 1. Please find the call for papers below.

Call for Papers

Australian Society for French Studies

VIRTUAL CONFERENCE 2020

DIS/CONNEXION

3-4 December

Keynote speakers: Professor Lydie Moudileno (University of Southern California) and Associate Professor Mame-Fatou Niang (Carnegie Mellon University)

In light of the current situation, the ASFS has had to come to the inevitable decision of postponing the conference that was scheduled to take place in New Zealand this year, to 2021. In order to maintain a sense of community, and academic discussions around our research and future, the ASFS Conference will move online in a shorter format for 2020.

During a time of social distancing, in which we are requested to “Stay Apart Together”, the ASFS 2020 conference will bring members together to reflect upon the theme of connection and disconnection.

We invite proposals for papers and panels related to the conference theme. Papers may reflect upon, but are not limited to:

  • The role of the Humanities in general, and of language, literature and culture in particular, during times of crisis and social unrest
  • Literary, artistic and cinematic representations of connection and disconnection
  • The dis/connection between World and national literatures, cinema and history, and other forms of transnational connections
  • The Medical Humanities and the ethics of care
  • The Digital Humanities
  • Language pedagogy and (dis)connection
  • Interdisciplinary connections (and their limits)

Paper presentations will be scheduled for 10 minutes. Panels will be scheduled for 45 minutes, with 3 presentations and discussion.

The conference will be free to all members of the ASFS. Presenters will be required to join the Society by 1 November.

The Postgraduate Session will take place on the morning of 3 December via Zoom, led by Postgraduate Officer Dr Clara Sitbon. The Postgraduate Session is free and open to all members.

The conference will feature keynotes and roundtables, will include different formats for special events, and will incorporate social spaces such as a virtual coffee room running alongside and between panels.

We hope that this will allow members to continue to engage with the ASFS activities and with each other in these trying times.

Deadline for submitting paper and panel proposals: 25 September 2020 to Dr Leslie Barnes, Secretary: leslie.barnes@anu.edu.au.

Appel à communications

Australian Society for French Studies

CONFÉRENCE VIRTUELLE 2020

DÉ/CONNEXION

3-4 décembre

Intervenants principaux : Professor Lydie Moudileno (University of Southern California) et Associate Professor Mame-Fatou Niang (Carnegie Mellon University)

Au vu de la situation actuelle, l’ASFS a dû prendre la difficile décision de repousser sa conférence annuelle, qui devait initialement se tenir en Nouvelle-Zélande en décembre cette année, à 2021. Pour maintenir un sentiment de communauté, et pour poursuivre les importantes discussions qui conditionnent notre recherche et notre avenir, l’ASFS souhaite maintenir une version virtuelle de sa conférence, dans un format plus court.

A une époque de distanciation sociale, où nous sommes exhortés à être distancés ensemble, l’édition 2020 de la conférence ASFS entend rassembler ses membres autour de réflexions sur les thèmes de connexion et déconnexion.

L’ASFS invite des propositions de communications autour de ces deux thèmes. Les communications peuvent aborder les éléments suivants, sans pour autant y être exclusivement limitées :

  • Le rôle des Sciences Humaines (Humanities), des langues, de la littérature et de la culture, en temps de crise et de troubles sociaux
  • Représentations littéraires, artistiques, cinématographiques de connexions et déconnexions
  • La dé/connexion entre les littératures, cinémas, histoires nationales et nationaux, et les littératures, cinémas et histoires du monde, ainsi que d’autres formes de connections transnationales
  • Les Humanités Médicales et l’éthique de la compassion
  • Les Humanités Numériques
  • Pédagogie linguistique et (dé)connexion
  • Connections interdisciplinaires (et leurs limites)

Les communications seront de dix minutes chacune, et les panels de 45 minutes chacun (pour trois présentations et discussions).

La conférence sera entièrement gratuite pour les membres de l’ASFS. Si vous n’êtes pas membres de la société mais que vous souhaitez présenter une communication, vous devrez joindre la société avant le 1er novembre 2020.

La session dédiée aux étudiants de troisième cycle aura lieu le matin du 3 décembre via Zoom, et sera coordonnée par Dr Clara Sitbon (Postgraduate Officer). Cette session est gratuite et ouverte à tous les membres.

La conférence comprendra des séances plénières et tables rondes, mêlera une variété de formats pour divers événements, et inclura des espaces sociaux virtuels (cafés virtuels) en parallèle et entre les différentes sessions.

Nous espérons que cela permettra aux membres de continuer à s’impliquer dans les activités de l’ASFS, et les un.e.s avec les autres durant ces moments difficiles.

Les propositions de communications et de panels sont à envoyer avant le 25 septembre 2020, à la secrétaire de la société, Dr Leslie Barnes (leslie.barnes@anu.edu.au).

Call for applications: National Recognition for Outstanding Teachers of French in Australia

FATFA prize

The Federation of Associations of Teachers of French in Australia (FATFA), the Embassy of France and SBS French radio have announced a new prize for ‘National recognition for outstanding teachers of French in Australia’. From FATFA:

“This year, to promote the profession of « professeur de français » and to celebrate the international « Journée du prof de français » on 26 November 2020, FATFA would like to officially recognise outstanding teachers of French at a national level, in conjunction with the Ambassade de France, SBS French radio, state Teachers of French Associations: AFTV, MLATQ, NATF, SAFTA, TOFAWA and the ASFS.

Do you know amazing teachers who show great enthusiasm and passion for their profession? Teachers who motivate, inspire their students with innovative teaching practices, and support and empower their colleagues? You can nominate a teacher in one of these 2 categories: Prix du jeune espoir – Young Hope Award or Prix du prof de français de l’année (expert).”

ASFS members should note that there is a category for university teachers of French. Applicants can nominate a colleague or self-nominate with a referee.

Consult the flyer here for criteria and application details, and submit your nomination by 30 September 2020 to Sabine Kuuse (sabine.kuuse@uwa.edu.au) and Diane de Saint Leger (ddsl@unimelb.edu.au).

Call for Papers: Australian Society for French Studies Virtual Conference, ‘Dis/connexion’, 3-4 December 2020

Australian Society for French Studies Conference 2021

8-10 December 2021

Un.sited: “Sites” in French Studies

Online conference

Hosted by the French Discipline, School of Language and Cultures

University of Queensland

We acknowledge the traditional owners of the lands on which the university stands.

It is intended that scheduling will accommodate speakers from a range of time zones – from other states in Australia and around the world.

Confirmed plenary speakers:

Professor Charles Forsdick, University of Liverpool

Professor Celeste Kinginger, Penn State University

Professor Valérie Loichot, Emory University

The label “French Studies” is applied to research and teaching in a range of disciplines united by the common thread of interest in phenomena related to particular sites, those where French is spoken. The notion of site, one from which practitioners are most usually distanced, is thus a primary enabler of our work, but is taken up in a wide range of ways. Rather than being neutral places, spaces or localities, sites carry specific meaning or have particular functions that may vary between disciplines and individuals. The significance of “sites” has been underscored by the restrictions on mobility enforced in response to the pandemic: many of us have found ourselves “un-sited”, removed from a specific point of contact, our sites more than ever out of sight. Yet we have also sought out alternative (often virtual) spaces with which to engage. New locations have become available through Zoom and our own homes have taken on new functions.

Therefore, at a time when mobility and access have been restricted and transformed in ways unimaginable a few years ago, in this conference we want to explore the notion of “site” and what it means in the various disciplines represented in French Studies through papers which illustrate its mobilisation (papers drawing on specific sites) or tackle the significance of “site” directly. How do specific physical spaces (their existence, accessibility or inaccessibility) become meaningful for your work, research, teaching and identity? How are notions of particular places given value? How do certain sites take on meaning through historical or sociocultural events? How do certain spaces exclude or include particular socio-cultural groups? Do they take on different meaning depending on identity categories? What alternative spaces have now become available?

Presentations might consider:

  • sites of authenticity
  • sites of imagination
  • sites of learning
  • sites of marginalisation/ marginalised sites
  • sites of memory
  • sites of pleasure
  • sites of suffering and infection
  • sites of tourism
  • sites of work
  • archives; archaeology
  • fieldwork
  • filming on location
  • imagined or mythic sites
  • literary and cinematic topographies
  • para/sites: questions of contiguity, interdisciplinarity, intersectionality
  • regional variations
  • student im/mobility; virtual mobility
  • télétravail and WFH
  • terroir
  • universities as transnational spaces

We invite proposals – in French or in English – for:

  • Individual research papers: presentations of 15 minutes, followed by 10 / 15 minutes of discussion.
  • Panels: three x 15-minute papers, followed by discussion.
  • Roundtable discussions: these might relate to research practice, to teaching practice, to language policy (for example).

As is the usual ASFS practice, we will consider proposals on topics other than the conference theme, within the constraints of the programme.

Proposals to be sent to https://forms.gle/7w3KejQN3J4FSwfP9 by 30 July 2021

Conference emails: asfs2021@uq.edu.au.

Registration: (Payment details to be provided later)

$30 flat rate for all attendees

This nominal fee will contribute to the costs of administrative and technical support. The Australian Society for French Studies will also sponsor the conference and you are therefore encouraged to renew your membership or become a member:

Postgraduates: $10

Sessional staff; retired; unwaged: $20

Fulltime staff: $30

Organizing committee:

Barbara Hanna; Joe Hardwick; Amy Hubbell; Jenny Davis Barnett; Beth Kearney; Peter Cowley

Call for initiatives: AFRAN, the Australian-French Association for Research and Innovation

ASFS members are encouraged to join AFRAN, the Australian-French Association for Research and Innovation, which is supported by the French Embassy of Australia.

Untitled

AFRAN has just announced their call for applications for funding under the 2020 initiatives scheme. Funding of up to $4,000 (from a pool of $20,000) is available for projects that strengthen French-Australian research relations. This year’s call for initiatives places a particular emphasis on multi-disciplinary collaborations with social sciences and the humanities. Membership is free and details for the scheme are available here.

From the AFRAN website:

Overview

This year’s call seeks to further empower the AFRAN community by supporting initiatives that complement those already eligible for funding under the suite of cooperation support mechanisms provided by the French Embassy in Australia (e.g. mobility, internships, or workshops). In 2020/2021, we will thus fund initiatives or series of smaller, integrated initiatives (e.g. series of network building activities, one-off or series of collaborative research exhibitions or productions, symposia/workshops focussed on community development) designed to federate, build and scale up thematic communities around particular research and innovation areas within the perimeter of AFRAN and/or between France and Australia. In the 2020/2021 call, there is a particular emphasis on inter-disciplinary initiatives, including with the social sciences and humanities.

For further information, please contact:

AFRAN

A/Prof Katherine Daniell
President, AFRAN Inc.
0419848256

katherine.daniell@anu.edu.au

Embassy of France
Ms. Nathalie Simenel-Amar
Service Science and Technology
02 6216 0139
nathalie.simenel-amar@diplomatie.gouv.fr

Call for Papers: ASFS/AJFS Postgraduate Essay Prize 2020

ASFS black and white logoThe Australian Society for French Studies and the Australian Journal of French Studies are pleased to announce the sixth annual co-sponsored ASFS/AJFS Postgraduate Essay Prize.

A prize of AU$500 will be awarded to the best article (4,000 to 6,000 words including notes) on any aspect of French Studies (except French Language Studies) by a postgraduate student. The winning essay will be published in the Australian Journal of French Studies.

Submission Guidelines

  • Entries are open to anyone enrolled in a Masters or PhD in an Australian or New Zealand university on the date of the submission deadline,
  • All applicants must be members of the Society,
  • Essays on any aspect of French and Francophone Studies (French language Studies) will be considered,
  • Essays must be an original piece of work not already under consideration for publication elsewhere,
  • Essays must not exceed 6,000 words and must be presented according to the AJFS Guidelines for Contributors,
  • Essays must be anonymised and not include the candidate’s name, that of their supervisors or institution,
  • Essays should be submitted to the Postgraduate Officer along with the submission form,
  • A panel of 3 members of the Society will evaluate all applications. The panel members will be selected from institutions other than those at which the applicants are candidates, and
  • All applicants will receive written feedback from the panel.

The following prizes will be awarded to the winner:

  • Publication of the winning essay in Australian Journal of French Studies, subject to the journal’s refereeing,
  • A certificate award at the annual ASFS conference, and
  • A cash prize of AU$500 jointly awarded by the ASFS and AJFS.

Deadline for submissions : 30 June 2020.

Submissions and enquiries should be directed to ASFS’s Postgraduate Officer, Clara Sitbon (clara.sitbon@sydney.edu.au).