CFP Literary Walks, Slow Travel, and Eco-Awareness in Contemporary Literature

CALL FOR ARTICLE PROPOSALS

Seeking submissions for a forthcoming issue of Studies in Twentieth and Twenty-First Century Literature with a special focus section entitled Literary Walks, Slow Travel, and Eco-Awareness in Contemporary Literature.

Guest Editor: Peter Arnds, Trinity College Dublin

One of the latest fitness trends from Sweden is the so-called ‘plogging’, picking up trash while jogging. Embarking from this image of social engagement for the purpose of healing the planet proposals are sought for an upcoming issue of Studies in Twentieth and Twenty-First Century Literature for a series of essays in English that analyse literary, filmic, or other artistic productions in twentieth- and twenty-first century German, French, Italian, or Spanish speaking cultures in view of the links between ‘slow travel’ and eco-awareness.

Slow travel implies an intensification of experiencing the environment, its devastation, and possibilities of healing. This is not limited to walking alone, although authors of literary walks such as W.G. Sebald or Friedrich Christian Delius are important for this volume. Such literature reveals the tension between the solitary walker distancing himself from the community with its social and political responsibilities, while at the same time actually engaging more closely with the global community and its concerns about the environment and politics. But walking in literature can also be an intensely neo-Romantic experience. When Percy Bysshe Shelley and Mary Wollstonecraft (later Mary Shelley) first eloped and found themselves stranded without money in Paris they decided to walk the 700 km distance to Switzerland. While nineteenth-century literature teems with walkers, how does this map out in the twentieth and twenty-first century?

Apart from this focus on literary walks we seek submissions on various other texts linking ecological awareness to unusual forms of travel. Proposed essays may include but are not limited to topics such as:

* walking as neo-romanticism

* slow travel and encounters with animals;

* theory of psychogeography

* walking and health in literature;

* debunking myths about other species;

* diversity of forms of slow travel in literature and film;

* eco-humor;

* intense encounters with the natural world;

* the potential of slow travel for healing oneself, others, and the planet at large (as in Werner Herzog’s winter walk from Munich to Paris);

* walking and eco-awareness in film and the visual arts;

* interdisciplinary approaches to slow travel and literature;

* walking and myth;

* slow travel, walking, and borders;

* nocturnal walking in literature

* metaphors of slow travel in the context of ecocriticism;

* slow travel, gender, and ecology;

* bicycling in contemporary literature;

* walking in the city versus nature;

* walking at night;

* walking and emotion;

* philosophies of slow travel in contemporary literary texts;

* wandering and resistance;

* walking as trauma;

* walking as privilege;

This volume argues that with the slowing down of physical mobility and the traveller’s self-marginalization and constant crossing of boundaries, walking and other forms of slow travel increase political alertness, reflection, and a tendency to protest. We are interested in submissions also that examine contemporary literature in light of the philosophical and literary roots of such travel (such as Jean Jacques Rousseau or Robert Louis Stevenson), and which engage densely with theories of slowness, wandering as resistance, and self-exiling during travel (e.g., Michel de Certeau’s The Practice of Everyday Life, Frédéric Gros’ Philosophy of Walking, Ernst Jünger’s Der Waldgang, Rebecca Solnit’s Wanderlust). The volume is open to a diversity of theorizations. What function does slow travel, especially walking, have for the social responsibility of travellers who follow what Deleuze and Guattari have called a rhizomatic trail across borderless smooth space? Rebecca Solnit has argued, for example, that slow travel “ideally is a state in which the mind, the body, and the world are aligned” (Wanderlust 2000).

As Guest Editor I am particularly interested in submissions which examine how literature and film represent slow travel — with its cosmopolitan, polyphonic messages, and the temporary exile of lonely and visionary individuals walking away from their communities and trespassing across communal, territorial, and national boundaries – and whether slow travel may in the end be more conducive to the healing of the planet than an insistence on social and political responsibility that is firmly attached to hermetically sealed-off civic, national, and thus ultimately imagined communities.

Studies in Twentieth and Twenty-First Century Literature is committed to publishing high quality, anonymously peer reviewed articles written in English on post-1900 literature, film, and media in French, German, and Spanish. The journal is devoted to theory and criticism in the modern languages, and encourages interdisciplinary and collaborative submissions. Many acclaimed literary critics and theoreticians have appeared in STTCL and served as guest editors of STTCL special issues dedicated to one language or theme. Likewise, the editorial advisory council includes esteemed authors, critics, and theoreticians in French, German, Spanish, and Comparative Literature. From 1976 to 2003, the journal was known as Studies in 20th Century Literature, and through 2013, it appeared in print form twice a year (winter and summer) and it is currently published in an online, Open Access format which enhances the journal’s sustainability and broadens its global readership.

Please provide a 500-word abstract for articles not to exceed 7500 words, along with a brief CV, complete contact details, and academic affiliation, in an email to arndsp@tcd.ie with the reference line of STTCL Abstract. The deadline for the submission of abstracts is February 1, 2019. If chosen for publication, the completed article will need to be submitted no later than July 1, 2019.

Dr. Peter Arnds
Trinity College Dublin
–  Head, Department of Italian
–  Director, M.Phil in Comparative Literature
–  Fellow TCD
Member, Academia Europaea

 

 

ASFS/AJFS Postgraduate Prize CFP 2018

The Australian Society for French Studies and the Australian Journal of French Studies are pleased to announce the fourth annual co-sponsored ASFS/AJFS Postgraduate Prize.

A prize of $500 will be awarded for the best article (4,000-6,000 words inc. notes) by a postgraduate student on any aspect of French Studies (except French language studies). The prize will be awarded at the annual conference of ASFS in Perth in December 2018, and the winning article will be published in a ‘miscellaneous’ issue of AJFS.

Applicants must be enrolled in a research higher degree at an Australian university and be a member of ASFS. Previous prize recipients are not eligible to submit an article. Articles may be written in English or French and must be presented according to AJFS style guidelines (see http://online.liverpooluniversitypress.co.uk/loi/ajfs or http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/australian-journal-french-studies/. They will be assessed by a joint ASFS/AJFS judging committee which may call upon relevant expertise in its deliberations.

The deadline for submissions for the inaugural prize is 31 July 2018. The winner will be announced in December 2018.

Submissions and enquiries relating to the ASFS/AJFS Postgraduate Prize should be directed to ASFS’s Postgraduate Officer, Sophie Patrick at sophie.patrick@une.edu.au.

AJFS 55.1 on Mobility and Migration, now available

The latest volume of the Australian Journal of French Studies is a “deuxième volet” of articles emanating from the 2016 ASFS conference in Adelaide. Congratulations to the editors and contributors who are members of ASFS.

 

Australian Journal of French Studies 55:1 (2018)

Mobility and Migration

Table of Contents

Natalie Edwards, Christopher Hogarth and Ben McCann, “Mobility and Migration in France and the Francophone World”

Natalie Edwards, “Virginie Despentes’s Mobile Women in Apocalypse Bébé

Kathryn Kleppinger, “Mobilities, Migrations, and Mysteries in Maurice Gouiran’s Marseille Polars

Clara Sitbon, “Fluctuations auctoriales au sein du hoax littéraire”

Bénédicte André, “‘Il y a toujours l’Autre’: Towards a Photomosaic Reading of Otherness in Island Short Story Collections”

Catherine Gilbert,Mobilising Memory: Rwandan Women Genocide Survivors in the Diaspora”

Alexandra Kurmann, “Aller-retour-détour. Transdiasporic Nomadism and Navigating Literary Prescription in the Work of Kim Thúy and Thanh-Van Tran-Nhut”

Sonia Wilson, “A Room of One’s Own? Gender and the voyage immobile in Leïla Sebbar’sVoyage en Algéries autour de ma chambre

Charles Forsdick, Afterword

Book Reviews (3)